You are at:

  1. Home »
  2. Topic »
  3. Highway Structures »
  4. Inspection

Inspection

Filter content

Filter by attributes
Filter by date

Documents

Title Document type Published Publisher
TAL 7/14 Mapping underground assets

Read document description

Advice on the various mapping techniques for locating and identifying buried pipes and cables. The use of these techniques can help reduce site occupation times when those assets require maintenance or repair.

Primary Doc. 12/11/14 Department for Transport Add icon
Prevention of Strikes on Bridges - A protocol for Highway Managers & Bridge Owners - Issue 2

Read document description

The Protocol gives guidance and advice to Highway Authorities and Bridge Owners to prevent strikes on bridges that span public highways

Primary Doc. 11/07/14 Department for Transport Add icon
Management of Highway Structures Complementary Guidance

Read document description

Management of Highway Structures: A Code of Practice was published in September 2005. Since then Government Policy in respect to highway and structures management has developed and evolved in a number of areas, including the introduction of new statutory duties on highways authorities. There have also been developments/advances with regard to recognised good practice. To assist users of the Code, the Roads Liaison Group has prepared this complementary guidance which takes account of these changes and developments. Where appropriate, the complementary guidance provides details of where to find up-to-date information that can assist with the implementation of the good practice set out in the Code. Users of the Code should treat this complementary guidance as up-to-date and having the same status as the Code. Where paragraphs have been amended, they supersede the ones in the Code.

Primary Doc. 27/05/11 UK Roads Liaison Group Add icon
TRL PPR 530 Visualisation and display of automated bridge inspection results

Read document description

The research described in this report is the fifth stage of an ongoing programme of research with the objective of developing a more objective and repeatable bridge inspection procedure than the current system of manual inspections. The proposed inspection procedure is based on the collection and processing of images of structures to identify defects in highway structures. The research has been funded by, and performed on behalf of, the Transport Research Foundation (TRF). This report describes changes to the image collection system, including the inclusion of a robotic mount system. This requires very little human input other than to perform a brief calibration to determine the camera field of view, and the extent of the scene to be imaged. This dramatically speeds up the image collection procedure which was previously very labour intensive. Possible changes to the manner in which the data is presented to the end user are also described. The use of 3-D modelling and display techniques is discussed, and several pieces of proprietary software are investigated. These software packages can manipulate and display LIDAR data. This data can be converted into 3-D models of the bridge. The 3-D bridge model can be further enhanced by texturing, using the high resolution images collected by the imaging system. The report also discusses the use of a web-based service which takes multiple images of a scene and uses these to create a 3-D model of the scene or object which was imaged. The advantages and disadvantages of using the web-based system as a key part of the inspection regime are discussed. The report concludes by outlining the key components required for a successful automated bridge inspection system based on images, which could provide inspection data at a level comparable to that currently provided by a standard Highways Agency General Inspection.

Research 13/01/11 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
Inspection of Highways Structures - process map

Read document description

This document was identified as part of the UKRLG Project on Design & Maintenance Guidance. Process map for actions required within West Lothian Council to undertake general, principal and special inspections.

Secondary Doc. 01/04/10 UK Roads Liaison Group Add icon
TRL PPR 338 Automated inspection of highway structures

Read document description

The recent collapses of the I-35W Mississippi River bridge in Minneapolis, and Montreal’s Boulevard de la Concorde overpass have highlighted the importance of regular structure inspections to ensure they remain safe and fit for purpose. Currently, in the UK, highway structures are assessed using a regime of visual inspections, performed by trained engineers. These inspections are performed at four levels: Routine, General, Principal and Special. The inspections cover a range of detail, from a cursory check for gross defects, to a close examination of all surfaces of the structure, including the use of special equipment if required. The quality of data collected depends on the ability of the inspectors to observe and objectively record details of defects. It has been found that the data provided by such inspections can vary significantly. Research has been performed to investigate the use of images of the structure to assess its condition off-site. The aim is not to remove the engineer from the inspection process but to assist them and make their job easier. The research has concentrated on two main areas: image collection, and image analysis. The image collection work has investigated the practical issues involved in imaging structures. Such issues include image resolution, lighting, removal of parallax, location referencing of individual images and the development of a prototype collection system. This prototype system makes use of distance measurement lasers and theodolites to determine the position of each image on the structure, and relative to any other image, making it easy to know precisely which parts of the structure are affected by any particular defect. The image analysis work has attempted to segment the images so that the defects or features present on the structure can be highlighted and classified. The segmentation work has made use of a number of image processing techniques including wavelet analysis and has achieved promising results to date. Processing work has begun to classify the segmented objects into those which should be present on the structure (cabling, drainage, lighting, etc) and those which should not be present on the structure (defects).

Research 12/12/08 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PPR 338 Automated inspection of highway structures

Read document description

The recent collapses of the I-35W Mississippi River bridge in Minneapolis, and Montreal’s Boulevard de la Concorde overpass have highlighted the importance of regular structure inspections to ensure they remain safe and fit for purpose. Currently, in the UK, highway structures are assessed using a regime of visual inspections, performed by trained engineers. These inspections are performed at four levels: Routine, General, Principal and Special. The inspections cover a range of detail, from a cursory check for gross defects, to a close examination of all surfaces of the structure, including the use of special equipment if required. The quality of data collected depends on the ability of the inspectors to observe and objectively record details of defects. It has been found that the data provided by such inspections can vary significantly. Research has been performed to investigate the use of images of the structure to assess its condition off-site. The aim is not to remove the engineer from the inspection process but to assist them and make their job easier. The research has concentrated on two main areas: image collection, and image analysis. The image collection work has investigated the practical issues involved in imaging structures. Such issues include image resolution, lighting, removal of parallax, location referencing of individual images and the development of a prototype collection system. This prototype system makes use of distance measurement lasers and theodolites to determine the position of each image on the structure, and relative to any other image, making it easy to know precisely which parts of the structure are affected by any particular defect. The image analysis work has attempted to segment the images so that the defects or features present on the structure can be highlighted and classified. The segmentation work has made use of a number of image processing techniques including wavelet analysis and has achieved promising results to date. Processing work has begun to classify the segmented objects into those which should be present on the structure (cabling, drainage, lighting, etc) and those which should not be present on the structure (defects).

Research 12/12/08 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
Intelligent monitoring of concrete structures

Read document description

Management of concrete structures requires an understanding of the deterioration processes involved and the rate at which they proceed. Intelligent monitoring is automated monitoring which explicitly provides information on current condition and deterioration rates to assist in predicting the remaining life of a component or structure. Surface mounted or embedded sensors may be used to monitor various aspects of structural condition, reinforcement corrosion, and the environment in and around a concrete structure.

Secondary Doc. 01/01/08 CIRIA Add icon
TRL PPR 255 Automated inspection of highway structures - Stage 2

Read document description

The quality of data provided by visual structure inspections can vary significantly from inspector to inspector and from inspection to inspection. Improvements to the quality of the inspections are therefore desirable. Research has been undertaken with a view to developing a system for collecting a series of images covering the entire surface of the structure, and then pre-processing the images prior to delivery to the engineers. The aim is that these pre-processed images should be able to give the engineer an overall view of the condition of the structure, and draw attention to those parts of the structure which contain most defects, or defect like features. The research has investigated two main areas: image collection and display; and image analysis. The image collection and display investigation considered the use of multiple imaging positions, single imaging positions, spherical images, and mathematically transforming images to re-project them as if they were taken perpendicular to the face of interest in order to remove the effects of parallax. The image analysis research considered the possibility of using high quality images of structures to provide a consistent and quantitative assessment of condition. Sufficient information and detail was seen in the images to perform meaningful and useful image based condition assessments. The focus of the research then switched to the use of automatic image processing techniques. The research in this area has focussed on reducing the incidence of false positive reports of defects, and delivering results to the engineers which make their job simpler, quicker and more cost effective.

Research 11/12/07 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PPR 197 High-tech remote monitoring for the management of highway structures

Read document description

This report describes the available high-tech methods for the remote monitoring of highway structures for the purpose of providing information to assist in the management of these structures. Monitoring the performance of a structure, or one its component parts, during construction and in service, can provide vital information on the ability of the structure to maintain full serviceability throughout its design life and in many instances for much longer periods of time. In many cases, monitoring has helped to alleviate doubts about structural safety and serviceability, and has assisted in making decisions to keep structures in full or part service. Information on structural performance can also be used to develop improved design standards for future structures. The report focuses on the use of monitoring as a tool for the management of structures which have failed a strength assessment according to the requirements of BD 21 (DMRB 3.4.3). The report builds on the information contained in BD 79 (DMRB 3.4.18) which provides guidelines on the management of sub-standard bridges and the role that monitoring can play in order to keep these bridges in service. The report also considers the use of monitoring as a management tool for new and innovative structures.

Research 23/04/07 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
Showing results 1-10 of 15
  • 1
  • 2