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Title Document type Published Publisher
TAL 3/14 Using hydraulically bound mixtures at road works

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Covers the use of hydraulically bound mixtures (HBMs) in road reinstatements layers. This has the advantages of: •potentially fewer work lorry trips required •the faster compaction times sometimes associated with HBMs and reduced site occupation times.

Primary Doc. 12/11/14 Department for Transport Add icon
Envirobed HA104

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A revolutionary, next generation, environmentally friendly bedding mortar alternative to resin-based materials. Specially formulated for the bedding of ductile ironwork conforming to the Highways Agency Design Manual for Roads and Bridges: Mortars for Bedding ironwork, HA104/02, part5, clause 6.1 and is particually suitable for use in wet weather conditions.

Product 19/07/11 Instarmac Add icon
Anti-Skid Thermoplastic Sheets - CoverGrip

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Ultracrete CoverGrip is a self-cleaning preformed thermoplastic anti-skid sheet and primer system for fast anti-skid treatment of in-situ and new road ironwork, such as manhole covers. CoverGrip should be used in conjunction with Ultracrete ThermoPrime to provide exceptional bond and durability.

Product 19/07/11 Instarmac Add icon
Ultracrete coverTEC D400

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Ultracrete coverTEC class D400 vehicular access covers are 3rd party certified by Lloyds British to fully comply with EN124: 1994 and offer a superior solution for vehicular access locations, and specifically for Group 4 applications where high speed traffic is prevalent.

Product 19/07/11 Instarmac Add icon
Bitumen Spray Sealer & Tack Coat

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Part of the Ultracrete BBA/HAPAS Approved Ironwork Reinstatement System. Ultracrete SCJ is a bitumen cold joint sealant spray, designed to seal and waterproof the vertical edges of macadam and asphalt within road and ironwork reinstatements. The product is ideal for promoting durability and longevity in temporary and permanent Ironwork reinstatements.

Product 19/07/11 Instarmac Add icon
Permanent Pothole Repair

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Ultracrete Permanent Pothole Repair is a suitable solution for the repair of potholes in roads, driveways and car parks. It can be trafficked instantly in wet, freezing or hot conditions, and at the same time is compatible with the existing road surface. Ultracrete Permanent Pothole Repair includes fully graded, High PSV interlocking aggregate and specially formulated bitumen, and is supplied in 25kg recyclable containers (Instarmac Plastic Containers Recycling Scheme is available for this product). Permanent Pothole Repair is the 1st ever and ONLY pothole repair material with HAPAS approval. Received in March 2011, Ultracrete are pleased to offer your this product, independantly tested by the BBA - suitable for both planned and reactive pothole repairs.

Product 19/07/11 Instarmac Add icon
Management of Highway Structures Complementary Guidance

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Management of Highway Structures: A Code of Practice was published in September 2005. Since then Government Policy in respect to highway and structures management has developed and evolved in a number of areas, including the introduction of new statutory duties on highways authorities. There have also been developments/advances with regard to recognised good practice. To assist users of the Code, the Roads Liaison Group has prepared this complementary guidance which takes account of these changes and developments. Where appropriate, the complementary guidance provides details of where to find up-to-date information that can assist with the implementation of the good practice set out in the Code. Users of the Code should treat this complementary guidance as up-to-date and having the same status as the Code. Where paragraphs have been amended, they supersede the ones in the Code.

Primary Doc. 27/05/11 UK Roads Liaison Group Add icon
TRL PPR 376 Bridge deck waterproofing: Non_U4 concrete finishes

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It is currently a requirement that when concrete bridge decks are re-waterproofed, repairs to the surface are needed so that the waterproofing is applied to a finish equivalent to the U4 finish defined in the Specification for Highway Works. A study has been carried out to assess whether lengthy and costly closures to make the repairs can be avoided by applying waterproofing directly to rough or damaged concrete surfaces. The most frequently occurring defects on bridge decks were identified and ranked according to their frequency, severity, difficulty to repair and cause of delays. Some defects must be repaired prior to waterproofing so the study focussed on other types. Finite element analyses determined the effect of increasing the thickness of the waterproofing membrane in large depressions. The maximum principal strains induced in surfacing overlaying a waterproofing system were calculated and fatigue lives were estimated. A laboratory investigation determined the ease of application of two spray-applied systems and a ‘pour and roll’ sheet system to concrete slabs with small depressions, small holes and ridges. The performance of the systems applied to slabs with defects and those with a U4 finish were compared. Tensile adhesion tests were carried out and the thickness of the membrane of the spray-applied systems was measured. The test results demonstrated that satisfactory waterproofing performance can be achieved by applying waterproofing to some defects, although the thickness of the membrane of the spray-applied systems was not easy to control and the defects were filled with bonding bitumen prior to the application of the sheet system. The benefits and costs of waterproofing a non-U4 finish without making repairs was assessed. The overall time savings if concrete repairs are not made before waterproofing a non-U4 finish may not be realised if other bridge works take longer than the time taken for concrete repairs to be made and cure. However, the use of rapid curing repair materials is likely to bring similar if not greater benefits than waterproofing without making repairs. A number of clauses are recommended for inclusion in the Specification for Highway Works.

Research 20/02/09 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PPR 376 Bridge deck waterproofing: Non_U4 concrete finishes

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It is currently a requirement that when concrete bridge decks are re-waterproofed, repairs to the surface are needed so that the waterproofing is applied to a finish equivalent to the U4 finish defined in the Specification for Highway Works. A study has been carried out to assess whether lengthy and costly closures to make the repairs can be avoided by applying waterproofing directly to rough or damaged concrete surfaces. The most frequently occurring defects on bridge decks were identified and ranked according to their frequency, severity, difficulty to repair and cause of delays. Some defects must be repaired prior to waterproofing so the study focussed on other types. Finite element analyses determined the effect of increasing the thickness of the waterproofing membrane in large depressions. The maximum principal strains induced in surfacing overlaying a waterproofing system were calculated and fatigue lives were estimated. A laboratory investigation determined the ease of application of two spray-applied systems and a ‘pour and roll’ sheet system to concrete slabs with small depressions, small holes and ridges. The performance of the systems applied to slabs with defects and those with a U4 finish were compared. Tensile adhesion tests were carried out and the thickness of the membrane of the spray-applied systems was measured. The test results demonstrated that satisfactory waterproofing performance can be achieved by applying waterproofing to some defects, although the thickness of the membrane of the spray-applied systems was not easy to control and the defects were filled with bonding bitumen prior to the application of the sheet system. The benefits and costs of waterproofing a non-U4 finish without making repairs was assessed. The overall time savings if concrete repairs are not made before waterproofing a non-U4 finish may not be realised if other bridge works take longer than the time taken for concrete repairs to be made and cure. However, the use of rapid curing repair materials is likely to bring similar if not greater benefits than waterproofing without making repairs. A number of clauses are recommended for inclusion in the Specification for Highway Works.

Research 20/02/09 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PPR 221 The performance of surfacing overlaying bridge deck waterproofing systems

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Information on the specification and performance of the surfacing overlaying concrete bridge decks owned by the Highways Agency is described. The main factors that affect the performance of surfacing of total thickness less than 100 mm, and the possible causes of the premature failures that have occurred on some bridges with liquid-applied waterproofing systems are identified. The results from laboratory tests that were carried out (i) to identify factors that affect the bond of surfacing to two bridge deck waterproofing systems, including wheel loading, (ii) to investigate the flow of sub-surface water through surfacing, and (iii) to measure the stiffness modulus of four waterproofing systems are presented. The local strains inducing by wheel loading in surfacing overlaying waterproofing systems that were calculated using the finite element method are reported. Recommendations are proposed to improve the durability of the surfacing on bridges that concern the provision of sub-surface drainage, the characteristics of the waterproofing system, the void content of the surfacing directly overlaying the system, and the bond of the surfacing to the system. The role of the red sand asphalt layer that is currently specified as an additional protective layer to the waterproofing system and is intended to act an indicator layer during resurfacing works is discussed, and its replacement is recommended.

Research 01/08/07 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
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