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Title Document type Published Publisher
Envirobed HA104

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A revolutionary, next generation, environmentally friendly bedding mortar alternative to resin-based materials. Specially formulated for the bedding of ductile ironwork conforming to the Highways Agency Design Manual for Roads and Bridges: Mortars for Bedding ironwork, HA104/02, part5, clause 6.1 and is particually suitable for use in wet weather conditions.

Product 19/07/11 Instarmac Add icon
Bitumen Spray Sealer & Tack Coat

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Part of the Ultracrete BBA/HAPAS Approved Ironwork Reinstatement System. Ultracrete SCJ is a bitumen cold joint sealant spray, designed to seal and waterproof the vertical edges of macadam and asphalt within road and ironwork reinstatements. The product is ideal for promoting durability and longevity in temporary and permanent Ironwork reinstatements.

Product 19/07/11 Instarmac Add icon
Management of Highway Structures Complementary Guidance

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Management of Highway Structures: A Code of Practice was published in September 2005. Since then Government Policy in respect to highway and structures management has developed and evolved in a number of areas, including the introduction of new statutory duties on highways authorities. There have also been developments/advances with regard to recognised good practice. To assist users of the Code, the Roads Liaison Group has prepared this complementary guidance which takes account of these changes and developments. Where appropriate, the complementary guidance provides details of where to find up-to-date information that can assist with the implementation of the good practice set out in the Code. Users of the Code should treat this complementary guidance as up-to-date and having the same status as the Code. Where paragraphs have been amended, they supersede the ones in the Code.

Primary Doc. 27/05/11 UK Roads Liaison Group Add icon
TRL PPR 362 Performance of impregnants

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Since the early 1990s there has been a requirement to utilise hydrophobic pore-lining impregnants to provide additional durability on Highways Agency structures subjected to aggressive conditions – primarily arising from the use of de-icing salts. The material that has generally been used as an impregnant is monomeric alkyl (isobutyl) – trialkoxy silane. More recently alternative materials have come onto the market and the Highways Agency (HA) has updated its requirements to include new test methods to assess the effectiveness and performance of pore-lining impregnants. The purpose of these tests is to facilitate the acceptance of these alternative materials. A series of experiments was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of available impregnants for suppressing the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and their long term effectiveness in service. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the ingress of chloride ions by ponding and water uptake by sorptivity was significantly reduced by treatment with the pore-lining impregnants. By contrast, pore-blockers provided only very limited resistance to chloride ingress and virtually no resistance to water uptake. A limited number of tests were also undertaken on cores extracted from bridges.

Research 26/11/09 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PRR 362 Performance of impregnants

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Since the early 1990s there has been a requirement to utilise hydrophobic pore-lining impregnants to provide additional durability on Highways Agency structures subjected to aggressive conditions – primarily arising from the use of de-icing salts. The material that has generally been used as an impregnant is monomeric alkyl (isobutyl) – trialkoxy silane. More recently alternative materials have come onto the market and the Highways Agency (HA) has updated its requirements to include new test methods to assess the effectiveness and performance of pore-lining impregnants. The purpose of these tests is to facilitate the acceptance of these alternative materials. A series of experiments was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of available impregnants for suppressing the ingress of chloride ions into concrete and their long term effectiveness in service. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the ingress of chloride ions by ponding and water uptake by sorptivity was significantly reduced by treatment with the pore-lining impregnants. By contrast, pore-blockers provided only very limited resistance to chloride ingress and virtually no resistance to water uptake. A limited number of tests were also undertaken on cores extracted from bridges.

Research 26/11/09 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PPR 136 Survey of impregnated structures

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BD43/90 (1990) ‘Criteria and material for the impregnation of concrete highway structures’ was published by the Highways Agency (HA) in 1990. This document specified the requirements for new HA structures to be treated with hydrophobic pore-lining impregnants to provide protection against the ingress of de-icing salts. There was also a requirement to apply impregnants to all in-service structures provided that their condition was suitable. Since 1990 it has been assumed that all new bridges have been treated and that the maintaining agents responsible have implemented the policy of treating in-service bridges. The HA commissioned TRL to carry out a survey of the 14 maintaining agents in England to assess the extent and effectiveness of treating bridges which have been constructed since 1990 and the older in-service bridges. The survey involved inviting the maintaining agents to complete questionnaires designed to yield information on the number of new and in-service bridges that had been treated and seek their opinions on the effectiveness of the policy. Within the scope of the project, it was only possible to obtain detailed information from two maintaining agents. The results from one of the agents showed that over 90% of the post-1990 structures had been treated compared with 30% for the pre-1990 structures. Information from the other agent showed that some of their pre-1990 structures had been treated. No information was supplied for the post-1990 structures. The results from the survey have highlighted the limitations in the current record keeping of impregnation and associated monitoring. It is considered that it would be highly desirable for HA to set up a system which requires maintaining agents and authorities responsible for new construction to record information on impregnation to assist with planning future maintenance strategies. The information should be in a form that can be easily entered into the Highways Agency Database (SMIS).

Research 14/09/06 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
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