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Title Document type Published Publisher
Operation od Traffic Signals During Low Demands

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Traffic signal design is a science that has been developed through decades to a point where the maximum efficiency can be squeezed out of the most congested of junctions. Conflicting needs of all road users are measured, evaluated and optimised such that the ever-increasing and varying demands continue to be managed with ingenuity and perfection. But roads aren’t always busy. In many cases the very justification for signal control is based on a problem that may only exist for a couple of hours each weekday. Even the most congested networks have their quiet moment, yet, in a deserted city at 3 in the morning, signals still cycle for non-existent traffic. Any driver who ventures into this scenario may sit in frustration at a red light while the ‘intelligent’ control system optimises the signals for phantom conflicting demands. In other countries various techniques are applied to ‘demote’ signalised junctions to priority mode of operation, for example the flashing amber on main road/flashing red on minor road employed in some States of the USA, or signals that simply turn off overnight as in parts of Europe.

Research 04/10/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists: Final Report

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This report focuses on a project undertaken for the Department for Transport (Traffic Management Division) in March 2011 entitled Investigation of Options for Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists at Signallised Junctions in the Urban Environment. It describes the outcome of a desktop study that investigates the techniques that are in common usage both in the UK and overseas for cyclist provision at traffic signals.

Research 24/09/12 Department for Transport Add icon
TAL 1/12: The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011

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The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011 (SI 2011 No. 3041) further amends the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 (“TSRGD 2002” – SI 2002 No. 3113) and came into force on 30 January 2012. Copies of the new SI are available from TSO at a price of £27.25 each. In addition to SI 2011 No. 3041, this Traffic Advisory Leaflet also contains guidance relating to the other sets of amendment regulations listed below, which came into force since the introduction of TSRGD 2002. Therefore, in addition to the current editions of Traffic Signs Manual, this document should be read in conjunction with the listed SIs and associated Traffic Advisory Leaflets, by all those involved in designing and implementing traffic management schemes and in road traffic regulation generally. While this Traffic Advisory Leaflet is intended to assist readers, it is neither legal advice nor a substitute for reference to the relevant legislation - and should not be relied on as such.

General Information 07/03/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Advisory Leaflet 5/11 - Quality Audit

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This leaflet gives advice on the use of Quality Audit (QA) in the street design process as outlined in Manual for Streets, Manual for Streets 2 Wider Application of the Principles and Local Transport Note 1/08 Traffic Management and Streetscape.

General Information 14/11/11 Department for Transport Add icon
Management of Electronic Traffic Equipment

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This Code of Practice is the first document within the UK which establishes a series of good practice policies and procedures, obtained from experts, on how to effectively manage the maintenance of fixed location electronic traffic control equipment. The growth of technology in the highways sector has led to improvements in congestion control and a reduction in carbon emissions. Adoption of the recommendations within this code will help local authorities achieve delivery of high quality services. This code will become the fourth code within the current suite of codes, and will sit alongside Well-lit Highways, Well-maintained Highways and the Management of Highway Structures.

Primary Doc. 22/09/11 UK Roads Liaison Group Add icon
Midnight Switch Off for Motorway Lighting Monitoring Plan Report (12 Month)

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A report describing the results and lessons learnt from introducing six sites of midnight to 5.00am road lighting switch-off on 40km of motorway around the south of England. The project was commissioned by the Highways Agency to reduce carbon consumption and evidence is presented to show how over 400 tonnes of carbon were saved for 40km of midnight to 5.00am switch-off without having any adverse impact on road safety. The report discusses injury and non-injury incidents, overrides (where the lighting was remotely restored due to incidents on the network), stakeholder feedback, equipment performance, traffic flow analysis and lessons learnt. Some conclusions and recommendations are described.

Research 01/06/10 Highways Agency Add icon
TRL PPR 382 Review of the lighting requirement for traffic signs and bollards

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Improvements in the quality of street lighting and the development of high performance retro-reflective signing materials potentially make unlit traffic signs more visible. TRL conducted a technical review, commissioned by Transport for London, into the requirement for local highway authorities to comply with the current statutory requirements for lighting traffic signs and bollards in areas with street lighting. As well as reviewing the regulations and the appropriate British Standards, a whole life cost benefit exercise was conducted. This covered the costs of different types of traffic signing material, their luminaires, life expectancy and maintenance. In addition, the costs, life expectancy and maintenance of alternative types of illuminated traffic sign were established. A workable guidance document was produced to inform local highway authority engineers when it is advisable and safe to relax the statutory requirements for lighting traffic signs and traffic bollards as part of a traffic management scheme in areas with street lighting. Practical guidance was also supplied covering the use of all types of lit and unlit traffic signs. Documentation was produced describing the process of obtaining official authorisation from the appropriate government department in order to relax the use of traffic signing without external illumination in areas with street lighting.

Research 26/02/09 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PPR 383 Guidance on the lighting requirements for traffic signs and bollards

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Improvements in the quality of street lighting and the development of high performance retro-reflective signing materials potentially make unlit traffic signs more visible at night. TRL conducted a technical review, commissioned by Transport for London, into the requirement for local highway authorities to comply with the current statutory requirements for lighting traffic signs and bollards in areas with street lighting. This guidance document has been produced to inform local highway authority engineers when it is currently permitted to remove traffic sign and bollard lighting, and identifies future research opportunities that may lead to wider relaxation of lighting requirements. As well as reviewing the regulations and the appropriate British Standards, a whole life cost benefit exercise was conducted. This covered the costs of different types of traffic signing material, their luminaires, life expectancy and maintenance. In addition, the costs, life expectancy and maintenance of alternative types of illuminated traffic sign were established. Documentation was produced describing the process of obtaining official authorisation from the appropriate government department in order to relax the use of traffic signing without external illumination in areas with street lighting.

Research 26/02/09 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
TRL PPR 383 Guidance on the lighting requirements for traffic signs and bollards

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Improvements in the quality of street lighting and the development of high performance retro-reflective signing materials potentially make unlit traffic signs more visible at night. TRL conducted a technical review, commissioned by Transport for London, into the requirement for local highway authorities to comply with the current statutory requirements for lighting traffic signs and bollards in areas with street lighting. This guidance document has been produced to inform local highway authority engineers when it is currently permitted to remove traffic sign and bollard lighting, and identifies future research opportunities that may lead to wider relaxation of lighting requirements. As well as reviewing the regulations and the appropriate British Standards, a whole life cost benefit exercise was conducted. This covered the costs of different types of traffic signing material, their luminaires, life expectancy and maintenance. In addition, the costs, life expectancy and maintenance of alternative types of illuminated traffic sign were established. Documentation was produced describing the process of obtaining official authorisation from the appropriate government department in order to relax the use of traffic signing without external illumination in areas with street lighting.

Research 26/02/09 Transport Research Laboratory Add icon
LTN 03/08 Mixed Priority Routes: Practitioners' Guide

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In 2000,1 the Department for the Environment, Transport and the Regions (now the Department for Transport, DfT) published its strategy for road safety in Tomorrows Roads Safer for Everyone. In this document Mixed Priority Routes were identified as being among the least safe of urban roads. Subsequently, the DfT invited local highway authorities to submit schemes for inclusion in the Mixed Priority Routes (MPR) Road Safety Demonstration Project where DfT grants of up to £1 million were available for each participating authority. The ten schemes selected to be included in the project covered a spectrum of different types of authority and highway characteristics. This document reviews the experience from the ten schemes involved in the Demonstration Project and presents the lessons learned through the project to assist practitioners develop similar successful schemes. This report provides guidance for project managers and senior technical staff who might be involved in the development and delivery of MPR schemes, building on the experience of those that have already been through the process and understand the organisation and delivery issues involved. The MPR schemes have unique technical solutions to the redesign of their streets. It is not the purpose of this document to set out technical solutions. A brochure entitled High Street Renaissance and detailed scheme reports are also published on the DfT website, www.dft.org.uk. Summary Mixed Priority Routes are streets that carry high levels of traffic and also have: a mix of residential use and commercial frontages; a mix of road users, i.e. shoppers, cyclists, bus passengers, schoolchildren; a mix of parking and deliveries; They are not just transport routes. Although dealing with transport and safety is a key element, other concerns associated with the local economy and local communities may also generate an interest in improving the area with economic regeneration and environmental improvements. There are many benefits to be gained from enhancing the high street environment with an integrated approach. The investment is likely to contribute towards assisting the delivery of a range of local authority corporate objectives and targets including: accessibility planning; accident reduction; economic regeneration; Public Service Agreement; quality of life; and sustainability.

Primary Doc. 01/10/08 Department for Transport Add icon
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