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Title Document type Published Publisher
Operation od Traffic Signals During Low Demands

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Traffic signal design is a science that has been developed through decades to a point where the maximum efficiency can be squeezed out of the most congested of junctions. Conflicting needs of all road users are measured, evaluated and optimised such that the ever-increasing and varying demands continue to be managed with ingenuity and perfection. But roads aren’t always busy. In many cases the very justification for signal control is based on a problem that may only exist for a couple of hours each weekday. Even the most congested networks have their quiet moment, yet, in a deserted city at 3 in the morning, signals still cycle for non-existent traffic. Any driver who ventures into this scenario may sit in frustration at a red light while the ‘intelligent’ control system optimises the signals for phantom conflicting demands. In other countries various techniques are applied to ‘demote’ signalised junctions to priority mode of operation, for example the flashing amber on main road/flashing red on minor road employed in some States of the USA, or signals that simply turn off overnight as in parts of Europe.

Research 04/10/12 Department for Transport Add icon
TAL 1/12: The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011

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The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011 (SI 2011 No. 3041) further amends the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 (“TSRGD 2002” – SI 2002 No. 3113) and came into force on 30 January 2012. Copies of the new SI are available from TSO at a price of £27.25 each. In addition to SI 2011 No. 3041, this Traffic Advisory Leaflet also contains guidance relating to the other sets of amendment regulations listed below, which came into force since the introduction of TSRGD 2002. Therefore, in addition to the current editions of Traffic Signs Manual, this document should be read in conjunction with the listed SIs and associated Traffic Advisory Leaflets, by all those involved in designing and implementing traffic management schemes and in road traffic regulation generally. While this Traffic Advisory Leaflet is intended to assist readers, it is neither legal advice nor a substitute for reference to the relevant legislation - and should not be relied on as such.

General Information 07/03/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Bus punctuality partnerships: guidance for local authorities and operators

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This guidance has been produced by DfT's Bus Punctuality Working Group, a stakeholder group set up to develop a more effective punctuality regime. It is informed by the experience of local authorities and bus operators around the country and offers a framework which local authorities and bus operators can use to work together to achieve results. It sets out why punctuality and reliability are important, and explains how a partnership approach can help to deliver high standards of punctuality. It contains examples of good practice which are already being used, together with a model which has been developed for use 'off the peg' or which can be adapted according to local circumstances, including a model data sharing agreement.

Secondary Doc. 11/07/11 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Signs (Amendment) Regulations and General Directions 2011

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The Secretary of State— (a)in exercise of powers conferred by section 64(1), (2) and (3) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984(1), makes the regulations contained in Part 1 of this instrument; and (b)in exercise of powers conferred by section 65(1) of that Act(2), gives the general directions contained in Part 2 of this instrument. In relation to the regulations contained in Part 1 of this instrument, the Secretary of State has, in accordance with section 134(2) of that Act, consulted with such representative organisations as the Secretary of State thought fit.

Legislation 09/05/11 Department for Transport Add icon
Manual for Streets 2: Wider Application of the Principles

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Streets and roads make up around three-quarters of all public space – their design, appearance, and the way they function have a huge impact on the quality of people’s lives. Manual for Streets 2 - Wider Application of the Principles is the result of collaborative working between the Department for Transport and the transportation industry. It is an excellent demonstration of what can be achieved when Government works in partnership with professional industry representatives. The aim of the document is to extend the advantages of good design to streets and roads outside residential areas and to provide an environment that improves the quality of life. By rethinking the way high streets and non-trunk roads are designed, the fabric of public spaces and the way people behave can be changed. It means embracing a new approach to design and breaking away from inflexible standards and traditional engineering solutions. The new guide does not supersede Manual for Streets; rather it explains how the principles of the first document can be applied more widely. The guide further integrates the fundamentals of “Link and Place”, allowing designers to set the right design strategy for the particular nuances of busier streets. It also outlines a process to deliver the Governments new de-cluttering agenda. The flexible and pragmatic guidance will assist all professionals involved in regeneration, development and highway management with a toolkit of approaches and methods that address the challenges on our busier streets.

Secondary Doc. 29/09/10 CIHT Add icon
Delivering Sustainable Low Carbon Travel: An Essential Guide for Local Authorities

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Sustainable travel initiatives have the potential to add real value to the next round of Local Transport Plans (LTP). This guide seeks to complement statutory LTP Guidance by providing support for developing a sustainable travel business case based on the latest evidence and good practice from around the country.

Primary Doc. 01/11/09 Department for Transport Add icon
LTN 03/08 Mixed Priority Routes: Practitioners' Guide

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In 2000,1 the Department for the Environment, Transport and the Regions (now the Department for Transport, DfT) published its strategy for road safety in Tomorrows Roads Safer for Everyone. In this document Mixed Priority Routes were identified as being among the least safe of urban roads. Subsequently, the DfT invited local highway authorities to submit schemes for inclusion in the Mixed Priority Routes (MPR) Road Safety Demonstration Project where DfT grants of up to £1 million were available for each participating authority. The ten schemes selected to be included in the project covered a spectrum of different types of authority and highway characteristics. This document reviews the experience from the ten schemes involved in the Demonstration Project and presents the lessons learned through the project to assist practitioners develop similar successful schemes. This report provides guidance for project managers and senior technical staff who might be involved in the development and delivery of MPR schemes, building on the experience of those that have already been through the process and understand the organisation and delivery issues involved. The MPR schemes have unique technical solutions to the redesign of their streets. It is not the purpose of this document to set out technical solutions. A brochure entitled High Street Renaissance and detailed scheme reports are also published on the DfT website, www.dft.org.uk. Summary Mixed Priority Routes are streets that carry high levels of traffic and also have: a mix of residential use and commercial frontages; a mix of road users, i.e. shoppers, cyclists, bus passengers, schoolchildren; a mix of parking and deliveries; They are not just transport routes. Although dealing with transport and safety is a key element, other concerns associated with the local economy and local communities may also generate an interest in improving the area with economic regeneration and environmental improvements. There are many benefits to be gained from enhancing the high street environment with an integrated approach. The investment is likely to contribute towards assisting the delivery of a range of local authority corporate objectives and targets including: accessibility planning; accident reduction; economic regeneration; Public Service Agreement; quality of life; and sustainability.

Primary Doc. 01/10/08 Department for Transport Add icon
Dublin Transportation Office

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The Dublin Transportation Office (dto). The DTO is a Republic of Ireland government agency, formed in 1996, which provides transport and land use advice to organisations operating in the Greater Dublin Area. This site will provide users with information on dto and its projects. It provides access to the latest Journey time surveys, road user monitoring reports, and quality bus corridor monitoring reports.

Useful Website 01/01/08 Roads Service Northern Ireland Add icon
Bus Priority at Traffic Signals Keeps London's Buses Moving Secondary Doc. 01/01/06 Transport for London Add icon
Bus Stop Design Guide

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This Bus Stop Design Guide has been jointly produced by Road Service and Translink. The main purpose of this Design Guide is to present current best practice in relation to accessibility at bus stops. The document outlines requirements that meet the needs of bus users and, the changing profile of the Northern Ireland bus fleet with the introduction of low floor buses.This guide is intended for use by all types of professionals involved in the planning, design and provision of bus stop infrastructure so that good practice can be applied consistently across Northern Ireland. Indeed, one of the main themes behind this guide is that the bus stop is viewed as a holistic environment rather than just somewhere for a bus to stop. The implementation of the initiatives contained in this strategy will, over the strategy period, make a significant contribution towards the achievement of the “vision” for transportation contained in the Regional Development Strategy for Northern Ireland 2025 (Shaping our Future).

Primary Doc. 03/10/05 Roads Service Northern Ireland Add icon
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