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Title Document type Published Publisher
DSOPM002: Bus Stops & Shelters

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to bus stops and shelters. It was originally published (electronically) in 2007 and was updated (in print and online) in September 2012. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing how easy it is to access one of the most effective forms of public transport for keeping older people mobile, socially connected and less susceptible to loneliness and isolation. The guidance is based on the views of over 200 older people, street audits and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on the provision, location and positioning of bus stops, their overall size and type and their detailing (material, seating, lighting and signage).

Secondary Doc. 06/09/12 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
TAL 1/12: The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011

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The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011 (SI 2011 No. 3041) further amends the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 (“TSRGD 2002” – SI 2002 No. 3113) and came into force on 30 January 2012. Copies of the new SI are available from TSO at a price of £27.25 each. In addition to SI 2011 No. 3041, this Traffic Advisory Leaflet also contains guidance relating to the other sets of amendment regulations listed below, which came into force since the introduction of TSRGD 2002. Therefore, in addition to the current editions of Traffic Signs Manual, this document should be read in conjunction with the listed SIs and associated Traffic Advisory Leaflets, by all those involved in designing and implementing traffic management schemes and in road traffic regulation generally. While this Traffic Advisory Leaflet is intended to assist readers, it is neither legal advice nor a substitute for reference to the relevant legislation - and should not be relied on as such.

General Information 07/03/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Signs (Amendment) Regulations and General Directions 2011

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The Secretary of State— (a)in exercise of powers conferred by section 64(1), (2) and (3) of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984(1), makes the regulations contained in Part 1 of this instrument; and (b)in exercise of powers conferred by section 65(1) of that Act(2), gives the general directions contained in Part 2 of this instrument. In relation to the regulations contained in Part 1 of this instrument, the Secretary of State has, in accordance with section 134(2) of that Act, consulted with such representative organisations as the Secretary of State thought fit.

Legislation 09/05/11 Department for Transport Add icon
LTN 03/08 Mixed Priority Routes: Practitioners' Guide

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In 2000,1 the Department for the Environment, Transport and the Regions (now the Department for Transport, DfT) published its strategy for road safety in Tomorrows Roads Safer for Everyone. In this document Mixed Priority Routes were identified as being among the least safe of urban roads. Subsequently, the DfT invited local highway authorities to submit schemes for inclusion in the Mixed Priority Routes (MPR) Road Safety Demonstration Project where DfT grants of up to £1 million were available for each participating authority. The ten schemes selected to be included in the project covered a spectrum of different types of authority and highway characteristics. This document reviews the experience from the ten schemes involved in the Demonstration Project and presents the lessons learned through the project to assist practitioners develop similar successful schemes. This report provides guidance for project managers and senior technical staff who might be involved in the development and delivery of MPR schemes, building on the experience of those that have already been through the process and understand the organisation and delivery issues involved. The MPR schemes have unique technical solutions to the redesign of their streets. It is not the purpose of this document to set out technical solutions. A brochure entitled High Street Renaissance and detailed scheme reports are also published on the DfT website, www.dft.org.uk. Summary Mixed Priority Routes are streets that carry high levels of traffic and also have: a mix of residential use and commercial frontages; a mix of road users, i.e. shoppers, cyclists, bus passengers, schoolchildren; a mix of parking and deliveries; They are not just transport routes. Although dealing with transport and safety is a key element, other concerns associated with the local economy and local communities may also generate an interest in improving the area with economic regeneration and environmental improvements. There are many benefits to be gained from enhancing the high street environment with an integrated approach. The investment is likely to contribute towards assisting the delivery of a range of local authority corporate objectives and targets including: accessibility planning; accident reduction; economic regeneration; Public Service Agreement; quality of life; and sustainability.

Primary Doc. 01/10/08 Department for Transport Add icon
Bus Stop Design Guide

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This Bus Stop Design Guide has been jointly produced by Road Service and Translink. The main purpose of this Design Guide is to present current best practice in relation to accessibility at bus stops. The document outlines requirements that meet the needs of bus users and, the changing profile of the Northern Ireland bus fleet with the introduction of low floor buses.This guide is intended for use by all types of professionals involved in the planning, design and provision of bus stop infrastructure so that good practice can be applied consistently across Northern Ireland. Indeed, one of the main themes behind this guide is that the bus stop is viewed as a holistic environment rather than just somewhere for a bus to stop. The implementation of the initiatives contained in this strategy will, over the strategy period, make a significant contribution towards the achievement of the “vision” for transportation contained in the Regional Development Strategy for Northern Ireland 2025 (Shaping our Future).

Primary Doc. 03/10/05 Roads Service Northern Ireland Add icon
Planning for Public Transport in Developments

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Designing public transport facilities into new and existing developments is difficult. While there is much experience and guidance available for designing for motorised traffic when designing for public transport, developers, planners, designers, highway and traffic engineers must frequently start from a less than ideal situation. Over recent years few developments have been designed or adapted to cater for access by public transport. These new IHT guidelines provide the advice that is needed. Transport policy has changed significantly in recent years. There is a now consensus that we should encourage and provide for greater use of public transport. The Government sees provision for public transport as an integral part of an Integrated Transport Policy: "At the heart of the policies which we intend to develop are our aims of better and more integrated public transport systems". Furthermore in 1994 the Royal Commission on Environmental Pollution recommended that the proportion of passenger-kilometres by public transport increased by 12 per cent in 1993 to 29 per cent in 2005 and 30 per cent by 2020. There can be no doubt that conditions for public transport operators and users in Britain can be substantially improved. British and continental experience suggests that towns can significantly raise the level of bus-use, and that public transport use is compatible with modern prosperous economies and attractive environments. The question, therefore, is how can this best be achieved?

Secondary Doc. 10/04/99 CIHT Add icon
Bus Priority Secondary Doc. 01/03/99 CIHT Add icon
Transport in the Urban Environment

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Transport in the Urban Environment is a complete re-write of the technical manual, "Roads and Traffic in Urban Areas" (better known as RTUA or "the Brown Book" which was published in association with the Department of Transport). RTUA proved to be a particularly useful source of information for practitioners involved in urban planning and development especially those in the fields of highway and traffic engineering, transportation and town planning. Since there have been radical changes in the way that transport is viewed Transport in the Urban Environment gives great emphasis upon ensuring that the potentially damaging effects of transport upon the environment are avoided or, at least, mitigated. One such change is the growing debate over sustainable development and the impacts that transport can have on the urban environment which has continued not only within the UK but in many other countries. Transport in the Urban Environment is a "reference of first resort", providing a comprehensive guide to virtually every aspect of transport in urban areas. The volume is divided into six parts

Secondary Doc. 02/06/97 CIHT Add icon
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