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Health and Safety

road workers The management, education and training of employers and employees to ensure that sufficient care is exercised during the design, construction and operation of road infrastructure projects to minimise the occurrence of accidents to the workforce or between road users, and those employed on the road network. 

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Title Document type Published Publisher
TAL 8/14 Implementing extended working hours at road works

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What you need to take into account if you’re considering extended working hours to reduce overall site occupation times. This guidance focuses on works in urban areas where there is greater need to limit disturbance to residents and others.

Primary Doc. 12/11/14 Department for Transport Add icon
DSOPM004: Pedestrian Crossings

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to relates to pedestrian crossings. It was first published (in print and online) in July 2013 and launched at the annual conference of the Local Government Association. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing the ‘walkability‘ of local neighbourhoods, particularly with regards to pedestrian safety and comfort. The guidance is based on the views over 1,600 pedestrians, street audits and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on providing accessible crossing amenities that send out a consistent message to all users and flags the importance of raising awareness among pedestrians as to how crossings work and why.

Secondary Doc. 02/07/13 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
Operation od Traffic Signals During Low Demands

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Traffic signal design is a science that has been developed through decades to a point where the maximum efficiency can be squeezed out of the most congested of junctions. Conflicting needs of all road users are measured, evaluated and optimised such that the ever-increasing and varying demands continue to be managed with ingenuity and perfection. But roads aren’t always busy. In many cases the very justification for signal control is based on a problem that may only exist for a couple of hours each weekday. Even the most congested networks have their quiet moment, yet, in a deserted city at 3 in the morning, signals still cycle for non-existent traffic. Any driver who ventures into this scenario may sit in frustration at a red light while the ‘intelligent’ control system optimises the signals for phantom conflicting demands. In other countries various techniques are applied to ‘demote’ signalised junctions to priority mode of operation, for example the flashing amber on main road/flashing red on minor road employed in some States of the USA, or signals that simply turn off overnight as in parts of Europe.

Research 04/10/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists: Final Report

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This report focuses on a project undertaken for the Department for Transport (Traffic Management Division) in March 2011 entitled Investigation of Options for Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists at Signallised Junctions in the Urban Environment. It describes the outcome of a desktop study that investigates the techniques that are in common usage both in the UK and overseas for cyclist provision at traffic signals.

Research 24/09/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Investigating the potential health benefits of increasing cycling in the Cycling City and Towns

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This paper presents the results of analysis of the CCT Evaluation Baseline Survey results by independent expert Nick Cavill in collaboration with DfT social researchers. The analysis investigates the potential for delivering public health benefits through increasing cycling amongst different population groups. It then explores the size and characteristics of those groups to inform the targeting of cycling interventions. The results are relevant to local authorities who are making the case for investment in cycling, and considering how best to design schemes to realise the health benefits of cycling.

Research 24/04/12 Department for Transport Add icon
TAL 1/12: The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011

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The Traffic Signs (Amendment) (No.2) Regulations and General Directions 2011 (SI 2011 No. 3041) further amends the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002 (“TSRGD 2002” – SI 2002 No. 3113) and came into force on 30 January 2012. Copies of the new SI are available from TSO at a price of £27.25 each. In addition to SI 2011 No. 3041, this Traffic Advisory Leaflet also contains guidance relating to the other sets of amendment regulations listed below, which came into force since the introduction of TSRGD 2002. Therefore, in addition to the current editions of Traffic Signs Manual, this document should be read in conjunction with the listed SIs and associated Traffic Advisory Leaflets, by all those involved in designing and implementing traffic management schemes and in road traffic regulation generally. While this Traffic Advisory Leaflet is intended to assist readers, it is neither legal advice nor a substitute for reference to the relevant legislation - and should not be relied on as such.

General Information 07/03/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Accessible train and station design for disabled people

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Under s.71B of the Railways Act 1993 the Secretary of State maintains a Code of Practice to protect the interests of disabled people travelling by rail. All passenger train station operators are encouraged to use the document, and those who are licensed must follow its standards. Accessible Train Station Design for Disabled people: A Code of Practice Version 01, published in July 2008, replaced the previous version published by the Strategic Rail Authority, and incorporated a clearer structure, more-up-to-date guidance, and standards mirroring new European rules. This new Version 03 of the Code of Practice (valid from November 2011) replaces all previous versions. It provides standards and guidance for accessibility at railway stations, updated to more accurately reflect the BS8300 changes in 2009, and should be used by all train and station operators whenever they carry out works on their facilities.

Primary Doc. 16/11/11 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Advisory Leaflet 5/11 - Quality Audit

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This leaflet gives advice on the use of Quality Audit (QA) in the street design process as outlined in Manual for Streets, Manual for Streets 2 Wider Application of the Principles and Local Transport Note 1/08 Traffic Management and Streetscape.

General Information 14/11/11 Department for Transport Add icon
Transport Winter Resilience

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Emergency preparation Preparing for Emergencies helps individuals and communities be better prepared to deal with the impacts of emergencies. UK resilience contains emergency planning guidance and information for government organisations for a wide number of potential crises.

General Information 31/10/11 Department for Transport Add icon
Shared Space Local Transport Note 1/11

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Shared space is a design approach that seeks to change the way streets operate by reducing the dominance of motor vehicles, primarily through lower speeds and encouraging drivers to behave more accommodatingly towards pedestrians. In the UK, shared space is usually applied to links and minor junctions with the aim of allowing pedestrians to move more freely within the space. This Local Transport Note (LTN) focuses on High Street environments, but many of its principles will apply to other types of shared space.

Research 20/10/11 Department for Transport Add icon
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