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Road Safety

road safetyThe management, education and training of road users and the design and operation of road infrastructure to minimise the occurrence of collisions between road users, and where they do occur to reduce the level of harm (deaths, injuries, and property damage) resulting from said collisions.

Documents listed in this section cover Factors Contributing to Accidents, Legislation and Obligations, Urban Safety Management, Rural safety Management, Accident Analysis and Investigation, Local Safety Schemes, Road Safety Audit, Education, Training and Publicity, Enforcement, Safety Cameras, Monitoring and Evaluation. You can refine your search by selecting a narrower topic heading listed below. 

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Documents

Title Document type Published Publisher
Planning for Walking

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This Chartered Institution of Highways and Transportation (CIHT) guideline Planning for Walking: • describes the characteristics of pedestrian journeys, • lists the benefits of walking, • identifies factors that discourage walking and how they can be overcome, • summarises the legal framework that applies to pedestrians and • outlines the way that plans and strategies for pedestrian travel are developed. As it is a web-based publication that can be modified relatively easily, CIHT would welcome examples that build on the content of this guidance for inclusion in further guidance on the subject. These guidelines are complemented by another CIHT document, Designing for Walking (CIHT, 2015), which covers the design and evaluation of facilities for pedestrians

Secondary Doc. 19/03/15 CIHT Add icon
Road Safety Observatory

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The Road Safety Observatory aims to provide easy access to independent road safety research and information for anyone working in road safety and for members of the public. It provides summaries and reviews of research on a wide range of road safety issues, along with links to original road safety research reports. The information on the Road Safety Observatory website is provided free of charge, and you do not need to register to use this website.

Useful Website 18/02/15 Department for Transport Add icon
Prevention of Strikes on Bridges - A protocol for Highway Managers & Bridge Owners - Issue 2

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The Protocol gives guidance and advice to Highway Authorities and Bridge Owners to prevent strikes on bridges that span public highways

Primary Doc. 11/07/14 Department for Transport Add icon
Surface Dressing Code of Practice

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This sixth edition of the Code of Practice has been produced by the RSTA Surface Dressing Technical Committee. It has been reviewed in the context of the European Standard for Surface Dressing BS EN 12271 published in September 2006 along with the national guidance document PD6689:2009. This document has been peer reviewed by ADEPT Soils, Materials, Design and Specifications Committee. To the highway engineer, surface dressing offers a quick, efficient and cost-effective way of maintaining skid-resistant and waterproofing road surfaces. To obtain the best results it is necessary to give careful consideration to a wide range of detail and to plan and design the work carefully. The speed of the surface dressing operation and the short duration of time during which motorists are inconvenienced is also an important issue. The purposes of surface dressing are to waterproof the road surface, to arrest disintegration, to provide texture, and provide a skid-resistant surface. This latter quality can play a major part in accident reduction and was highlighted by the initiative of the Department of Transport in 1987 when the Minister introduced minimum mean summer SFC values for motorways and trunk roads. The importance of surface texture as provided by surface dressing has been highlighted by TRL report LR 286, which stresses that texture depth is important under both wet and dry conditions. Up to date guidance is available in the Design Manual for Roads & Bridges (DMRB): Volume 7 HD 28. The DMRB is available on line at www.dft.gov.uk/ha/standards/dmrb/. A useful way of comparing the effectiveness of a dressing, or other maintenance work, is to express it in terms of a ‘cost life index’. This is the cost per square metre of the work divided by the service life in years. It provides a measure of the “value for money” which the highway authority is achieving. A low ‘cost life index’ and “high value for money” is the result of high-quality work. The purpose of this Code is to identify the important aspects of the process, and to refer to other documents relating to good surface dressing practice and so give practical guidance on achieving high quality.

Product 01/02/14 unknown Add icon
Traffic Signs Manual Chapter 4: Warning Signs (2013)

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2013 UPDATE - Through the Traffic Signs Manual, the Department for Transport provides guidance to traffic authorities and sign designers on good practice in respect of the design and use of traffic signs in order to provide appropriate and adequate information for road users. The Manual is published by TSO as a number of discrete chapters each of which deals with a specific signing topic. We have made changes to Chapter 4 to bring it up to date following the amendments that were made to the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2002. Chapter 4 of the Manual is concerned with signs that warn road users of hazards ahead and was last updated in 2008. The main changes relate to the signing of low bridges and on using the new triangular warning sign that indicates maximum height in both imperial and metric units. Bridge strikes, where vehicles, their loads or equipment collide with bridges, are a significant and recurring problem and the revised guidance gives highway authorities up to date information and demonstrates the Department’s ongoing commitment to tackling the risk.

Primary Doc. 30/07/13 Department for Transport Add icon
DSOPM004: Pedestrian Crossings

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to relates to pedestrian crossings. It was first published (in print and online) in July 2013 and launched at the annual conference of the Local Government Association. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing the ‘walkability‘ of local neighbourhoods, particularly with regards to pedestrian safety and comfort. The guidance is based on the views over 1,600 pedestrians, street audits and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on providing accessible crossing amenities that send out a consistent message to all users and flags the importance of raising awareness among pedestrians as to how crossings work and why.

Secondary Doc. 02/07/13 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
Operation od Traffic Signals During Low Demands

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Traffic signal design is a science that has been developed through decades to a point where the maximum efficiency can be squeezed out of the most congested of junctions. Conflicting needs of all road users are measured, evaluated and optimised such that the ever-increasing and varying demands continue to be managed with ingenuity and perfection. But roads aren’t always busy. In many cases the very justification for signal control is based on a problem that may only exist for a couple of hours each weekday. Even the most congested networks have their quiet moment, yet, in a deserted city at 3 in the morning, signals still cycle for non-existent traffic. Any driver who ventures into this scenario may sit in frustration at a red light while the ‘intelligent’ control system optimises the signals for phantom conflicting demands. In other countries various techniques are applied to ‘demote’ signalised junctions to priority mode of operation, for example the flashing amber on main road/flashing red on minor road employed in some States of the USA, or signals that simply turn off overnight as in parts of Europe.

Research 04/10/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists: Final Report

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This report focuses on a project undertaken for the Department for Transport (Traffic Management Division) in March 2011 entitled Investigation of Options for Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists at Signallised Junctions in the Urban Environment. It describes the outcome of a desktop study that investigates the techniques that are in common usage both in the UK and overseas for cyclist provision at traffic signals.

Research 24/09/12 Department for Transport Add icon
DSOPM002: Bus Stops & Shelters

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to bus stops and shelters. It was originally published (electronically) in 2007 and was updated (in print and online) in September 2012. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing how easy it is to access one of the most effective forms of public transport for keeping older people mobile, socially connected and less susceptible to loneliness and isolation. The guidance is based on the views of over 200 older people, street audits and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on the provision, location and positioning of bus stops, their overall size and type and their detailing (material, seating, lighting and signage).

Secondary Doc. 06/09/12 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
DSOPM003: Tactile Paving

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to relates to tactile paving. It was first published (in print and online) in September 2012. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing the ‘walkability‘ of local neighbourhoods, particularly with regards to the safety and comfort of footways. The guidance is based on the views of over 1,400 pedestrians, street audits, laboratory tests and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on the siting, laying and maintenance of blister and corduroy paving, including which colours and materials to specify.

Secondary Doc. 06/09/12 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
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