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Pedestrians

PedestriansA pedestrian is a person travelling on foot, whether walking or running.

Documents listed in this section cover Vulnerability of Pedestrians, Strategies to Provide for Walking, Developing Pedestrian Networks, Dropped Crossings, Pedestrian Refuges, At–Grade Pedestrian Crossings, Facilities for People with Disabilities, Guard–Rails, Walking, Footways, Footpaths, Street Audits.

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Documents

Title Document type Published Publisher
Designing for Walking

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This document explains how facilities for walking should be designed, following on from how they are planned, which is covered in Planning for Walking. Well-designed facilities that follow desire lines, are clutter-free, and are legible to all users will assist in enabling walking journeys and improve the experience of those already walking. The design of facilities should also consider the volumes of people walking along (actual or desired) or crossing streets, and the solutions will depend on a variety of considerations. The needs of all users should be carefully taken into account and prioritised as appropriate.

Secondary Doc. 19/03/15 CIHT Add icon
Surface Dressing Code of Practice

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This sixth edition of the Code of Practice has been produced by the RSTA Surface Dressing Technical Committee. It has been reviewed in the context of the European Standard for Surface Dressing BS EN 12271 published in September 2006 along with the national guidance document PD6689:2009. This document has been peer reviewed by ADEPT Soils, Materials, Design and Specifications Committee. To the highway engineer, surface dressing offers a quick, efficient and cost-effective way of maintaining skid-resistant and waterproofing road surfaces. To obtain the best results it is necessary to give careful consideration to a wide range of detail and to plan and design the work carefully. The speed of the surface dressing operation and the short duration of time during which motorists are inconvenienced is also an important issue. The purposes of surface dressing are to waterproof the road surface, to arrest disintegration, to provide texture, and provide a skid-resistant surface. This latter quality can play a major part in accident reduction and was highlighted by the initiative of the Department of Transport in 1987 when the Minister introduced minimum mean summer SFC values for motorways and trunk roads. The importance of surface texture as provided by surface dressing has been highlighted by TRL report LR 286, which stresses that texture depth is important under both wet and dry conditions. Up to date guidance is available in the Design Manual for Roads & Bridges (DMRB): Volume 7 HD 28. The DMRB is available on line at www.dft.gov.uk/ha/standards/dmrb/. A useful way of comparing the effectiveness of a dressing, or other maintenance work, is to express it in terms of a ‘cost life index’. This is the cost per square metre of the work divided by the service life in years. It provides a measure of the “value for money” which the highway authority is achieving. A low ‘cost life index’ and “high value for money” is the result of high-quality work. The purpose of this Code is to identify the important aspects of the process, and to refer to other documents relating to good surface dressing practice and so give practical guidance on achieving high quality.

Product 01/02/14 unknown Add icon
Safety at street works and road works: a code of practice 2013

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The statutory ‘Code of practice 2013’ is a revision to the existing ‘Code of practice 2001’. Known informally as the ‘safety code’ or the ‘red book’, it comes into force on 1 October 2014 and provides updated guidance on safe working at street works and road works sites. The code has been designed to make it simpler to follow and the site layout diagrams have been redrawn to make them easier to understand. It encourages safer working practices and there is more emphasis on risk assessment, providing for pedestrians and other vulnerable road users, and site-specific design. Additional guidance is given on mobile and short duration works and working near tramways and railways, and advice on high visibility clothing and the signing and visibility requirements for works vehicles has been updated. The code also encourages operatives to think about minimising inconvenience to road users.

Legislation 22/10/13 Department for Transport Add icon
DSOPM004: Pedestrian Crossings

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to relates to pedestrian crossings. It was first published (in print and online) in July 2013 and launched at the annual conference of the Local Government Association. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing the ‘walkability‘ of local neighbourhoods, particularly with regards to pedestrian safety and comfort. The guidance is based on the views over 1,600 pedestrians, street audits and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on providing accessible crossing amenities that send out a consistent message to all users and flags the importance of raising awareness among pedestrians as to how crossings work and why.

Secondary Doc. 02/07/13 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
TAL 2/13: bollards and pedestrian movement

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Bollards are a common design of vehicle security barriers (VSB) that are required in certain locations to mitigate criminal or terrorist vehicle-borne threats. Bollard type VSBs provide a solution that resolves many common operational issues faced at busy transport interchanges. Observational surveys and research studies have been carried out under normal travel conditions to assess whether permanent bollards schemes affect pedestrian movement or give rise to additional health and safety concerns. Studies of evacuation scenarios have not been carried out. This traffic advisory leaflet (TAL) outlines the findings of these studies and provides guidance to inform the planning and design of bollard schemes installed for the purpose of hostile vehicle mitigation.

Primary Doc. 23/05/13 Department for Transport Add icon
TAL 2/13: bollards and pedestrian movement

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Bollards are a common design of vehicle security barriers (VSB) that are required in certain locations to mitigate criminal or terrorist vehicle-borne threats. Bollard type VSBs provide a solution that resolves many common operational issues faced at busy transport interchanges. Observational surveys and research studies have been carried out under normal travel conditions to assess whether permanent bollards schemes affect pedestrian movement or give rise to additional health and safety concerns. Studies of evacuation scenarios have not been carried out. This traffic advisory leaflet (TAL) outlines the findings of these studies and provides guidance to inform the planning and design of bollard schemes installed for the purpose of hostile vehicle mitigation.

Primary Doc. 23/05/13 CPNI Add icon
Operation od Traffic Signals During Low Demands

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Traffic signal design is a science that has been developed through decades to a point where the maximum efficiency can be squeezed out of the most congested of junctions. Conflicting needs of all road users are measured, evaluated and optimised such that the ever-increasing and varying demands continue to be managed with ingenuity and perfection. But roads aren’t always busy. In many cases the very justification for signal control is based on a problem that may only exist for a couple of hours each weekday. Even the most congested networks have their quiet moment, yet, in a deserted city at 3 in the morning, signals still cycle for non-existent traffic. Any driver who ventures into this scenario may sit in frustration at a red light while the ‘intelligent’ control system optimises the signals for phantom conflicting demands. In other countries various techniques are applied to ‘demote’ signalised junctions to priority mode of operation, for example the flashing amber on main road/flashing red on minor road employed in some States of the USA, or signals that simply turn off overnight as in parts of Europe.

Research 04/10/12 Department for Transport Add icon
Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists: Final Report

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This report focuses on a project undertaken for the Department for Transport (Traffic Management Division) in March 2011 entitled Investigation of Options for Traffic Management Techniques for Cyclists at Signallised Junctions in the Urban Environment. It describes the outcome of a desktop study that investigates the techniques that are in common usage both in the UK and overseas for cyclist provision at traffic signals.

Research 24/09/12 Department for Transport Add icon
DSOPM003: Tactile Paving

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to relates to tactile paving. It was first published (in print and online) in September 2012. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing the ‘walkability‘ of local neighbourhoods, particularly with regards to the safety and comfort of footways. The guidance is based on the views of over 1,400 pedestrians, street audits, laboratory tests and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on the siting, laying and maintenance of blister and corduroy paving, including which colours and materials to specify.

Secondary Doc. 06/09/12 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
DSOPM001: Seating

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This I’DGO design guidance relates to public seating in streets and neighbourhoods. It was originally published (electronically) in 2007 and was updated (in print and online) in September 2012. It is part of The Design of Streets with Older People in Mind; a toolkit for those who plan, design and maintain the public realm. It can be used as an aid to assessing the ‘walkability‘ of local neighbourhoods, particularly with regards to the provision of comfort facilities to break up the pedestrian journey. The guidance is based on the views of over 200 older people, street audits and key sources of existing UK guidance. It includes advice on how much seating is sufficient, the effective positioning of seating on the footway and the most suitable styles and materials for public seating.

Secondary Doc. 06/09/12 Inclusive Design for Getting Outdoors (I'DGO) Add icon
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